Memory and identity: the influence of early preservation practices on English culture

Abstract

Until the nineteenth century, written records were often considered an adequate form of preservation for historic monuments, buildings, and landscapes. The shift from written to physical preservation was a gradual one that was pioneered by seventeenth century chorographers, eighteenth century antiquarians, and nineteenth century archaeological and architectural societies. Drawing on the work of historians who have examined these eras of amateur historical study, this paper will examine how chorographers and antiquarians who have not always been given serious consideration by historians of the modern preservation movement were, in fact instrumental in popularising heritage and advocating for early protectionist measures.

Keywords

amateur history, antiquarians, chorography, preservation, history of heritage management

How to Cite

Rodriguez M. (2018) “Memory and identity: the influence of early preservation practices on English culture”, Postgraduate perspectives on the past. 3(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.5920/ppp.547

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Authors

Mariel Rodriguez (Cambridge University)

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Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

Peer Review

This article has been peer reviewed.

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